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  #1  
Old 05-04-2004, 05:14 PM
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Default Table Options

So I need to build a table.
For some this is almost religious. For me it is not.
But I do have questions.

How often will we need the 11' length. If it is not often i would like to do a smaller length that would take care of most all the layups and then add an extension for the really long layups.

Does that make sence? Any suggestions for the dimensions?
  #2  
Old 05-04-2004, 05:35 PM
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Default Big table

I have a 12' x 4' table and wouldn't do it any other way.

Here are things that use most of the length:

All of chapter 5 (fuselage sides)
Most of chapters 10 and 11 (canard and elevators)
Most of chapter 14 (spar)
All of chapter 19 (twice - once each wing)

Also keep in mind that smaller parts still require a bigger table. The turtleback is about 4' x 4' but while the jig is on the table you need space to cut foam, layout the plans, set aside all the glass for the part, etc.

I always like to have more than one part to work on. This way if I only have an hour say, I can cut some foam for a part but if I have four hours I can glass some other part. Having multiple parts going at once requires more table space.

I've wished I had a second, smaller table - say 4x4, a few times too. Then again I have a four car garage for my workshop

Having said all this I've heard of people making two smaller tables that clamp together nicely when needed.

Oh yeah - also make sure you can work from all four sides of the table - do not put the table against the wall - you'll be sorry.
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  #3  
Old 05-04-2004, 05:46 PM
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I made 4 of these, slightly larger than the plans call for. Now I can have virtually any size I want or need. Your mileage may vary.

http://www.eaa1000.av.org/technicl/w...l/worktabl.htm
  #4  
Old 05-04-2004, 05:57 PM
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Rick Maddy;
If you didnt have ALL FOUR CAR BAYS available how would you have done it? Say if you had a 2 car garage? Would you consider putting the narrow edge against the wall?

jimbus;
How much larger? 5'6" or 6'
Same width?
  #5  
Old 05-04-2004, 06:16 PM
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I went for the 6'x2'. I haven't made any parts yet, but I got some really nice tables!
  #6  
Old 05-04-2004, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
If you didnt have ALL FOUR CAR BAYS available how would you have done it? Say if you had a 2 car garage? Would you consider putting the narrow edge against the wall?
I spent the first 3 years in a 1.5 car garage with the same table. It's OK to have one short end against a wall but you will need to get to parts from both sides along the long length of the table.

Think about chapter 5 - you will have two fuselage sides on the workbench. You need to get to both - you can't lean over 4' of table - unless you're 8' tall - but then you wouldn't build a Cozy.

If you have little space I've suggest to people in the past to build in the following order:

Bulkheads and fuselage sides,
Parts for headrests
Landing gear
canard/elevators
spar
wings/winglets

Then go back and assemble the fuselage after getting rid of the big table for a small table. Having the fuselage tub on the floor all that time while working on the spar and wings is a big waste of space.
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  #7  
Old 05-04-2004, 06:48 PM
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Thank you so much Mr Maddy
That is one for the FAQ.
  #8  
Old 05-05-2004, 01:16 PM
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Default the long and short of it..

I wanted to add my $.02

I built a 12' x 42" table torsion box using 3/4 inch doublesided cabinet grade plywood (because I had it, I would not have spent $30 a sheet for it) top and bottom and 2 x 6 sides (the plans 1 x was too skinny) I used outdoor decking screws (not to be confused with drywall screws) to assemble it. I used 4 x 4 for the legs and lag bolted them to the inside of the 2 x 6s after I had built the box (I cut out holes using a sawz-all) I wanted to be able to disassemble the legs later to store the table (it's quite heavy though). I bought some refrigerator rollers and put them on the botton of the legs for levelling and movement.

Why not build smaller tables? They take up just as much room except they can be moved around. I don't like things moved around. I spend half my life looking for something I put down somewhere yesterday, (that's partly due to the fact that I am married and my wife is a perfect house keeper When my house was the "bachelor pad" I could leave something somewhere and come back in 3 months and it would still be there..socks, watch, wallet, keys, pizza.. ) Guys that come and visit me now think I moved into a new place.

The other reason is that the room under the bench is a handy place to store things, spare parts, engines, welder, Slade's gremlin cage..
But the main reason is because it is so much easier to level the table and leave it level. I have other smaller benches anyway attached to the walls.
They come in handy for parts..etc.

Don't forget to round off the edges of your new table with a good sander, (not TOO much, you don't want your beer to slide off) so you won't get cuts racing back and forth to the epoxy pump...
  #9  
Old 05-05-2004, 02:02 PM
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I would also add a 1/4(6mm) hard board sacrificial cover and keep waxed with non silicone containing wax for easy cleanup.
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Enjoy the build,njut av byggandet, godere il costruire, nyd bygningen, geniesse den Bau, apolafse tin kataskevi, disfrute la construcción, curta a construção, Pidä hauskaa rakentamisen parissa, bouw lekker,uživaj grade?inaslajdaites postroikoi, geniet die bou
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maker of wood, fiberglass, foam dust, metal bits and one day a Cozy will pop out and swiftly whisk me from meeting old friends and family to adventures throughout the world
  #10  
Old 05-05-2004, 03:57 PM
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I've got a 12 X 4 table with these features:

. very straight, flat, untwisted when setup.

. I can dis-assemble in about 5 minutes and store in a rather small space. (correction, clearing all the junk off the table adds about 30 minutes to the break-down)

. I can setup and align, all by myself, in about 30 minutes. It can be aligned despite the kind of wierd floor I had in my in my last shop. I can easily replace the top.

. not a heavy monster, but rather light-weight, and strong. I can move it and re-align it in about 30 minutes. It's based on 5 self-made, very straight, I-beams sitting on two metal saw-horses. The top consists of 2 4x6 sheets that lays on top with maybe a couple nails to hold in place.

Currently the table is in the stored configuration.

I'm at risk of moving periodically.
  #11  
Old 05-05-2004, 04:13 PM
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Is it top secret or are you gonna tell us all about it?
  #12  
Old 05-05-2004, 09:34 PM
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I am happy with my table but after seeing previous table discussions and thinking about what I'm actually gonna do on it I realized I probably exceeded requirements except for my need for mobility. I built the table with a religious passion. I don't recommend establishing this as a standard unless you could just buy one and pick it up.

I've seen many other simplier tables on web-pages along with completed flying birds on other pictures. I'd recommend this as a standard.
  #13  
Old 05-05-2004, 11:48 PM
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I'm beggin, your talkin to someone that uses $50 sheet for the spar jig and tounge and grooves it together, overbuilt is my middle name. Please, you have pics for usses(plural of us)
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Enjoy the build,njut av byggandet, godere il costruire, nyd bygningen, geniesse den Bau, apolafse tin kataskevi, disfrute la construcción, curta a construção, Pidä hauskaa rakentamisen parissa, bouw lekker,uživaj grade?inaslajdaites postroikoi, geniet die bou
dust

maker of wood, fiberglass, foam dust, metal bits and one day a Cozy will pop out and swiftly whisk me from meeting old friends and family to adventures throughout the world
  #14  
Old 05-06-2004, 12:02 AM
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Since you're begging and you're from Michigan, sure.

I like this edit capability, more and more.

Nevermind my 1st generation table. My 2nd generation table was to be based on trusses (i-beams) I bought thru the lumber store. They weren't as straight as I wanted. So I decided to make my own.

My 3rd generation table show below. 12feet by 4 feet. Made almost entirely of 1/2" SandPly from the big orange lumber store.

The 5 I-beams are 12inch by 12 feet. I went to great efforts to get straight edges and I got really great results. When I laid them flat on my gen-1 table and put them edge-to edge there were no gaps greater than 1/16 inch from end to end. They also have an almost perfectly consistent height from end to end for the entire set.

I cut and assembled the 5 i-beams myself using my $150 table saw and a guide on my 1st generation table to slide the sheets on. I learned that If you want the lumber store to rip it for you, insist they rip from the bottom, not the top of the sheet. From the top they come out more bent and they never have the same width. The employee will look at you funny so tell him you're preparing to make an airplane and the plans call for this technique. He'll get very friendly again and ask about the airplane.

After I cut my strips I stacked them all together, ran a nail thru them, stood them up vertically and then ran a custom sanding block over them. This sanding block has the width of the stack of strips and has two sides so it forms an upside-down U. This holds my sanding surface perpendicular to the sides of the sheet stack. Lots of checking during the sanding to get only the high spots.

The I-beams are lowered into vertical slots of a carefully made support, they fit snugly. The supports are bolted to the top of the collapsable saw-horses. The slots for the beams don't have much play but if I want to tighten them up more I gently kick the saw horses to be less perpendicular to the table and it gives them a good grip. The un-perpendicular isn't that much.

The two 4'x6' pieces of sandply lay on top, held in place by gravity, friction, and just a few nails. 4-6 nails per sheet would be plenty.

Why so many i-beams? The top will sag over time with greater distances between the supports.

To make the table-top untwisted when your floor is wierd, you only need to adjust one corner out of the 4. This is done by squeezing that pair of horse legs together to adjust the height of that corner. Then the legs get bondo'd to the floor. I use a 'Smart Level'

It might look flimsier than it is but it's very solid, with little to no wiggle or jiggle.

The sandply makes a pretty, hard, and flat surface for the table top. I expect it to get messed up as I work with it. When I find that my top is too messed up to work with I can just replace the top sheets.

It may be too tall for later work so at that time I expect to replace the saw-horses with something simple and lower.

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Last edited by tnt : 05-08-2004 at 09:34 AM. Reason: adding pic, reduce message count in thread
  #15  
Old 05-07-2004, 11:22 AM
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12 inch thick table, to me it don't look flimsey at all, it looks airworthy, good job. If it is worth building, it is worth overbuilding.

just wait until you drill hundreds of holes in it to hold things in place. In plane building, unlike furniture building, the table tends to be a sacrificial tool, he he he

Did you groove the i beems into the bottom of the top?
You may find it a bit too wide and decide to trim it to 40"
Cover it with a hard board top, and wax it, you won't be sad.

Bondo in place is good for a coupla of the chapters, but for most you can slide the table against wall to make more room in shop, or 14" from wall to make more room in shop, did i say we moved the table a bit to "make more room in the shop" Thats the kind of stuff you do with 4 wings, 2 fuselodges, two canards, work table, work bench, cutting table etc. etc. in the basement.

But the most important thing is to GET to building a plane on it.
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Enjoy the build,njut av byggandet, godere il costruire, nyd bygningen, geniesse den Bau, apolafse tin kataskevi, disfrute la construcción, curta a construção, Pidä hauskaa rakentamisen parissa, bouw lekker,uživaj grade?inaslajdaites postroikoi, geniet die bou
dust

maker of wood, fiberglass, foam dust, metal bits and one day a Cozy will pop out and swiftly whisk me from meeting old friends and family to adventures throughout the world
 

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